Effects of Obesity on Fertility Jacksonville FL

Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests. These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States.

Luis A Izquierdo
(904) 398-7684
836 Prudential Dr
Jacksonville, FL
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
David Lee Dalton, MD
(903) 535-9041
836 Prudential Dr Ste 1502
Jacksonville, FL
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx 78284
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Gerardo O Del Valle, MD
(904) 398-7684
836 Prudential Dr Ste 1800
Jacksonville, FL
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pr Sch Of Med, San Juan Pr 00936
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: Shands Jacksonville Med Ctr, Jacksonville, Fl
Group Practice: Regional Obstetric Consultants

Data Provided by:
Natasha Eliz
(904) 346-0050
836 Prudential Dr
Jacksonville, FL
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Gerald H Stenklyft
(904) 399-4862
836 Prudential Dr
Jacksonville, FL
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Edgard Ramos Santos, MD
(813) 971-6909
836 Prudential Dr
Jacksonville, FL
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal & Fetal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Central Del Caribe Sch Of Med, Bayamon Pr 00621
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Dr.Luis Izquierdo
(904) 398-7684
836 Prudential Dr # 1800
Jacksonville, FL
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Central Del Caribe Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1981
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Paul W Oberdorfer, MD FACS
930 Maple Ln
Jacksonville, FL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided by:
Tracey Schwartz Miller, MD
(904) 346-1943
2147 Belote Pl
Jacksonville, FL
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Vernon Michael Hignett, MD
Jacksonville, FL
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cape Town, Fac Of Med, Cape Town, So Africa
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Effects of Obesity on Fertility

Provided By:

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests.

These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States. The women completed surveys about their medical and sexual histories.

Overall, however, the women in the study, who ranged in age from 18 to 78 years, were as likely to have been pregnant and to have given birth to at least one live child as women in the general population. Seventy-nine percent of those who took part in the study had been pregnant at least once, and 74 percent had at least one live birth, the researchers found.

About half of the study participants aged 18 to 44 who could become pregnant said they wouldn't try to have more children after bariatric surgery. The women in this group hadn't reached menopause and weren't sterilized, didn't have partners who were sterilized, and didn't have some other obstacle in the way of pregnancy.

However, 30 percent of the women who could still become pregnant stated that pregnancy was very important to them, and one-third of this group planned to get pregnant within two years of undergoing bariatric surgery, the study authors noted.

"As the incidence of obesity increases in the United States, women's health care practitioners are likely to care for a substantial number of patients who will undergo bariatric surgery. Studies like this one are extremely useful to help us determine how to advise these patients and best meet their needs," said Dr. William Gibbons, president-elect of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, in a news release from the society.

The study findings appeared in the Oct. 7 online edition of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

More information

Learn more about bariatric surgery from the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

SOURCE: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 8, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com

Mailing Address:
Jacksonville Magazine
1261 King St.
Jacksonville, FL 32204
TEL: (904) 389-3622
FAX: (904) 389-3628
E-mail: mail@jacksonvillemag.com